The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes

GN 5. The Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman. Illustrated by Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg and Malcolm Jones III. 240 p. Published December 1989.

A few night’s ago my roommate and I went to hear Neil Gaiman speak at MIT’s Julius Schwartz Lecture Series. And to commemorate it, I decided to start reading Sandman, the series that made Gaiman famous. I managed to finish Preludes and Nocturnes just as the lights dropped.

Preludes and Nocturnes opens with Robert Burgess, the self-titled Daemon King, attempting to summon and capture Death for his own nefarious purpose. But instead he captures a younger member of the family: Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams and Nightmares. Burgess strips Morpheus of his mask, sand pouch, and ruby and keeps him trapped for over 60 years. At least until he dies and his now elderly son accidentally releases Morpheus.

The Sandman re-enters a world changed by the lack of his presence. But he finds himself too weak to retake control. Morpheus must reclaim the tools of his trade, and enlists the help of some of DC’s more infamous preternatural experts. Of course, not everyone is happy with Morpheus’s return, and he finds that he must adapt to this changed world. But soon the world will have to adapt, because The Sandman – the stuff of Dreams himself – is here to stay.

In Preludes and Nocturnes, Gaiman begins to reshape the world according to his own twisted vision. Pulling from ancient myth and modern legend, Gaiman engages the reader’s imagination like few others. I look forward to continuing the series.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Other Reviews of Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes: Madstop Reading, Nothing of Importance, The Hidden Side of a Leaf

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One response to “The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes

  1. Ah, we’ll be continuing the series together, then! I read this one, but have yet to move on to the second book. Thanks to your challenge, though, I’ll have to, in order to get to the third book while it’s still June.

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